Book Review

Moon Reads: Diary of an Accidental Witch – Unexpected Guests

Diary of an Accidental Witch: Unexpected Guests by Perdita and Honor Cargill. Illustrated by Katie Saunders

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px Grey

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


If you are new here, I have reviewed other books in this series because I really really enjoy it! You can read my review of the first book (Diary of an Accidental Witch), second (Flying High) and third (Ghostly Getaway) in their respective links.

The hard part fo reviewing a book you like is that then you struggle to say coherent things that tell others why you like it without being too much of spoilers, so here’s my attempt at it.

As usual, Bea wants to become the bestest witch ever and prove she can catch up with her peers who have had a lifetime of magic, compared to her very limited and relatively new experience of magic. So when the school has suddenly unexpected guests, her plans may go a bit awry, and she realises her non magical expertise and skills are an asset too and can help a lot in this magical world!

Filled with lots of funky magic, and a bit more development in the relationship between Bea and her dad who is one of my favourite book dads (he’s so supportive and chaotic but in a good way and tries so hard and loves Bea so much and it shows in all the books), there’s shenanigans and more to come but also, maybe a bit more love to show around the magical school and what the students can do best!

Book Review

Moon Reads: Sixteen Souls

Sixteen Souls by Rosie Talbot

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px Grey

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


Since it is Halloween and I finally managed to schedule posts for the blog without breaking it (fingers crossed honestly, so much woe and drama to be able to schedule stuff) why not post a good spooky book?

Sixteen souls is many things, for starters, it gives Wednesday and the Addams kinda vibes in some ways, but there is also angst and cuteness, and many ghosts, and a plot for evil, and romance and intrigue, and queerness. Honestly, there is a lot of goodness, but in a way, despite the fact I read this ages ago, it feels like it is also cosy in many ways.

It is weird to say a book is cosy when it deals with soukls, evil plots and all that, but the writing makes it in a way like a cosy spooky hug, and also, it makes me want to go back to York and just wander around it and enjoy the many quirky places.

I like that there’s a plethora of ghosts with personalities and Charlie isn’t the happiest about dealing with all the ghosts but he’s also accepted his lot in life and made friends, something about when life gives you lemons and all that I think but in ghost form. But it is one thing to complain about ghosts messing up things or causing drama and another to have your ghosts and what you are familiar with suddenly go weird and wrong.

Charlie felt like one of those reluctant heroes who will anyway do the right thing because he’s soft, but then also the twists in this book are good and I really enjoyed the vibes perfectly and the story , plus now there’s a sequel/tie in which I have yet to read but looking forward to as I own it.

Read this is you enjoyed watching Wednesday and the Addams, or if you like cosy mysteries with a dollop of queer (not the full cosy vibes), or if you want a York ghosts vibe too.

Book Review

Moon Reads: Spirits Abroad

Spirits Abroad by Zen Cho

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


For some reason unknown to me, I haven’t reviewed any of Zen’s books, however I have read a few and really enjoyed them, so when Spirits Abroad came out it was a good idea. And sometimes you just are in the mood for some short stories rather than a more epic one, right?

And this book is full of them.

The one first thing I will say, if you come to it expecting perfectly manicured short stories with a happy enidng or a perfect end to them, this is not it. This is more like grabbing a book of lore, of stories told around a camp fire, or around the kitchen during a gathering/party. It is a book of voices and ideas and therefore, of stories. And to me that is what absolutely shines here.

The stories are short, some way more than others, and they have a variety of flavours with all of them having some kind fo spirit or interesting otherness to it, a glint of magic in the ordinary or a ghost of weirdness and spookiness. But they are all ndeed captivating and honestly for most fo them, particularly some of the shorter ones, I wanted to know more of the story.

My personal favourite one is probably one of the longer ones where we have our main character of the story living with a bunch of aunties and some paranormal going on, while trying to live a very normal life thank you very much! I liked the mix of the normality, of the mundane with the not so common and the interesting “ending” we had for it.

I did read through this book slowly, as I had set myself to read a story or two (and sometimes, when I got hooked on the vibe of them, a few more) before bed, trying to stick to only reading a little bit because they were meant to help me relax, and they did in their own way.

Now, they are very much not Western short stories, and if you haven’t read a book from Zen Cho, I do want to let new readers know that there is a lot of words you may have to infer, to learn and cultural expressions too. I had to check up a few of the more interesting ones, and dig and dust some up I ahdn’t really heard or read in a while, but it still had a lot of value, and honestly, it made it quite itneresting to go learn new things and deep dive and accidentally end up looking recipes for whatever was mentioned in teh story at the time.

I think everyone would enjoy this book and the many stories in it, there’s a bit for everyone and lots of flavours that make it a rich and wonderful read.


Don’t miss out on the rest of the tour!

Book Review

Moon Reads: The Sun and the Void

The Sun and the Void by Gabriela Romero Lacruz

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


I will review this the same way I sold it to a friend recently. As a Mexican Latina, I tend to be cautious about Latinx books because I have been disappointed by a few. But this one feels right there with the experience. I know the world is fantasy, but the undercurrents of history are there, and the ways of life. Plus it has a glossary, it has pages presenting you the characters and what they do and mean, and the names are explained as to how it works in most of Latin America. So in that respect, it is already high on my list.

The second thing is that it has a wonderfully grey palette of characters. No one is perfect, there is no hero and no villain, everyone is doing a little bit of everything and depending on the lens, it is how they are perceived. They do say that history is written by the winning side or by specific points of view and so this shows true here.

The story focuses mostly on two main characters Reina and Eva, who both have been mistreated and have a deep longing for belonging. So we get the story from both sides, one a nozariel and one valco, which are the two subspecies that were native to the country before being conquered, with valcos being seen as better and nozariels as scum. However, neither of them s being treated particularly well and they are both trying to change their destiny. And well, destiny has plans for them involving the gods, some interesting schemes and a lot of twists and turns which I don’t really want to spoil.

I do take points because this story is so long and there were parts that tried to describe the world in far too much detail, alongside having a cast that was vast and sometimes in some ways not necessary. Too many names, too many characters, and the setup to the main story took about a third of the book, which I think could have been done a little bit better. And we get a lot of exposition of scenery and similar but little in ways of understanding some other workings of magic better, it becomes a mix of giving too much information on some things and then backtracking and giving too little. So a better balance could have been achieved.

Still, Reina and Eva move through the world trying their best to live a life that is worth living, and they do make mistakes, big and small ones, and they get swayed, used and try to set up who they are all along, which was very interesting to see, and their growth as characters. Particularly for me, it was Reina who shone in her growth, as it is a bit more of a chaotic one, whereas Eva keeps going in a much more steady line.

Overall, I do recommend reading it, it has some good representation woven through the fantasy world and the magic that exists in it. Geomancia was fascinating as a concept and in how it was deployed in the world and story. And you get some brilliantly grey characters, a lot of female ones for the lot and some other interesting bits. Give it a try!

Book Review

Moon Reads: Bride of the Tornado

Bride of the Tornado by James Kennedy

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


Bride of the Tornado surprised me. I started reading this book on a flight because I wanted to read through and I wasn’t sure how captive I would be to it. Let me tell you, I was caught hard!

The story follows our narrator, who tells of the day the “tornado” season started when things changed for her town. And in it, they are meant to wear funny clothes, meet a tornado boy who is meant to be saving them from the tornadoes building outside town. At first, it seems like a joke the adults are trying to play on everyone. But all of a sudden it becomes real, and slowly it is like they are in a cult where the tornados keep them captive and are somewhat sentient.

And then there is the boy, who for some reason fascinates our narrator. She cannot avoid him and stop trying to find out more about him, while the rest of the teenagers want to party, leave town or continue life without the weirdness of the tornadoes trapping them in this town. But not her, she needs to know more.

What comes next was fascinating, bizarre and mind-twisting for sure.

I think the reason I liked it, and that may have made others not like it as much, is that we have an unreliable narrator. Someone who is telling us the story through a very specific lens, so you question why she is doing it this way, and what the truth is. Will her truth and the real truth match? And why is everything happening?

You also get this weird mix of a cult, teenagers just wanting to be allowed to exist, our narrator who fits and doesn’t fit in and in some ways is trying to figure out where exactly does she fit and who she is. And then you have the adults who definitely have their own secrets.

It was a quick read, and I kept wanting to know more once I got hooked by all the odd action. The beginning chapters are a long setup to explain some of the things that will come next and partly because the narrator has to tell you about these things that marked her, that led her to where she goes.

Now it isn’t super scary in the gore side, but it does deal with some interesting proposals and some weirdness, so it is more uncanny and creepy than properly horrific and therefore was way more my type of read than I initially thought it would be. And it was worth giving it a chance, so I suggest you do too!

Also don’t forget to check out the other blog tour stops!

Book Review

Moon Reads: Lightfall – Shadow of the bird

Lightfall – Shadow of the bird by Tim Probert

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px Grey

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


In my last review, I talked a bit about the first book in this series, The Girl and the Galdurian and mentioned you’d want the second book at the ready, well, here is my review of it because I couldn’t leave you waiting.

As per the first book, the art is still wonderful, but the tone of it is slightly different, obviously, we have already met most of our main characters and gone from the nice life we used to have to a much more complicated plot and a darkness spreading across the land kinda vibe. This translates both in tones in the comic, but also in the storyline. There is growth or at least what may seem like it at first, but also a lot more conflict.

Bea has overall still her anxiety and the nerves, everything that she fears slowing her down and causing her to doubt, whereas Cad is so confident that it almost jars her and they seem to be finding points of disturbance, but in the end, this gets resolved.

What got me the most was the compassion and empathy Bea displays as the story goes and that she is willing to try to understand both sides of the story not just the one the “winners and survivors” have written, but that of those that lost. Were they genuinely evil or were they just defending their nest and home? What was the reason behind them behaving that way, and are they misunderstood or are they not?

Overall, the soothing vibe is still there but now you see a different more personal side, some more growth and empathy and compassion, things that sometimes we forget. The biases we have and the stories we are told against what the other side may be actually experiencing. It is also a way to show Cad that he may need to consider Bea has also value in her own way and he doesn’t know it all, as he sees himself as an unshakeable hero, but there is something he doesn’t know or understand and his truth may not be the full truth of how things were.

Highly recommended, and sadly the next book isn’t out yet or I would be reviewing it next, but do invest in this series as it is one I plan to re-read and enjoy!

Book Review

Moon Reads: Lightfall – The Girl and the Galdurian

Lightfall – The Girl and the Galdurian by Tim Probert

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px Grey

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


I can’t remember why I found this book so interesting, but it was on my wishlist for ages until it suddenly had a price reduction and became affordable alongside the fact that there’s now a sequel out too! So I bought it and I am so glad I did.

Let me start with the artwork which made me want to move into the woods and just live there with the characters, but it was also keeping really into the story and marvelling about everything. Then there are our main characters, Bea who is the adopted daughter of a pig wizard (adorable I tell you, and the ideas are so cute and make me smile), and Cad a Galdurian which is somehow supposed to be extinct but isn’t and this is confusing.

The whole adventure goes from “oh hey I am going to collect herbs” to epic levels quickly and to me the favourite part was that Bea has anxiety and enrves and mental health loitering and this shows beautifully int he art, you can understand how she feels, and relate to her and the situation being so overwhelming.

I think the one thing I wish I had gotten a better view of , is Cad mind, just a little bit and a bit more about the world before this, but it does go at a relatively active pace that starts slow and goes quicker untilw e get to the end of the story and now you want to read more.

Oh and the Pig Wizard grandfather figure kinda disappears, thre’s a bunch of cut interesting creatures and a lot fo epic journeys and saving the world and yet also a lot of “humanity” and kindness.

Cute story to be read together with a child, or just on your own when you need a little bit of hope and your brain is doing circles in a wheel that ti shouldn’t be running over and over, but still keeps doing. Soothing overall, and you will want the next book at the ready.

Book Review

Moon Reads: The life-changing magic of a little bit of mess

The life-changing magic of a little bit of Mess by Kerri Sackville

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px Grey

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


As someone who is chaotic and embraces it, this book felt right for me. So when Harper360 offered it for a review, I accepted. It was intriguing. And I wasn’t sure what to expect, would it actually save my life telling me chaos is the one way? Or was it actually going to try to reduce my level of chaos?

Turns out that this was all about having a little bit of fun and also, about learning that sometimes the mess is just you know, inevitable and there are other important things in life to prioritise over cleaning.

If you come to this book expecting perfectly amazing cleaning guidance and detailed how-to guides to achieve a magnificent balance of mess and cleanliness, this is so much not the book for you. But if you are a bit confused about how influencers seem to be living their best life with minimalism and spotless houses when you barely can keep up with life, then this may be a bit of comic relief and validation that mess is not that bad.

The main reason I didn’t give it full stars is that it does a little repetitive the kind of humour and it sometimes feels overdone, or becomes a bit less funny and more “oh you again”, but there is some good advise in that maybe not keeping the perfect pristine house isn’t the end of the world and being ok with having a house you can live in,m and noticing that you are balancing, work and maybe a family, and trying to keep healthy and everything else one is meant to do, it is hard to also keep a house perfectly clean.

For me, who has days of bad body movement where I knock tea cups (normally over my desk or my hobby area, trust me it is not fun), or days where standing requires a lot of effort, so tasks are hard and I decide to rest instead of pressuring myself, it was validating, but it also reminded me that the little hacks I’ve done don’t make me less of a good person or homekeeper. There is no moral value to keeping a pristine home. So buying a robot hoover (Chaos Bot even has a personality) to cope with the dirt and mud downstairs, or a cordless hoover, and a handheld little one because that means you can tackle each of the tasks in small amounts isn’t a bad thing.

So overall, validating, interesting, not advise on how to keep the perfect house, but also, the humour can be a little bit much (do consider I don’t read a lot of humour or comedy, but this book felt like something I should read and it was good to read).

Book Review

Moon Reads: Hungry Ghost

Hungry Ghost by Victoria Ying

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


I cant remember what made me pre-order this book, since I have been limiting my preorders a lot, trying to only buy a few preorders and read through my backlog, which is honestly terrifying. But I am glad I did.

Hungry Ghost takes is through the story of Valerie, who since she was young has felt the pressure to be perfect. And perfect is not just good grades, and being a good daughter, but being thin. And being thin comes at a cost which turns into purging and binging.

The story explains a little on why there is this pressure, and family dynamics, but you also learn a lot about Val in the way she interacts with her best friend Jordan.

I have to say that I enjoyed the art a lot and it lend itself to the story beautifully, each bouncing off the other and making it into a gorgeous graphic novel. The details are lovely, there’s a lot of keeping to a few nice palettes and themes, and there is joy in this work despite the topics included.

This leads to the fact that this is a book with a few content warnings, some of which be spoilers but still, my advise is to come at it knowing there is grief, toxic projections from a parent and of course eating disorders which then touch on fatphobia and similar issues. Still, it was nice to see Val journey through confronting her own “demons” and what her mind has created out of what everyone else has said to her, and the shape it has taken.

It also makes you question where you get your value and if chasing things like thinness or perfection truly brings you the happiness needed or if is it a failed attempt before you even start? Honestly, I breezed through this one and just felt enthralled by it.

One last thing is that it shines in showing that relationships in many ways, shapes and forms can be complex, and sometimes love is shown in a huge variety of ways, and sometimes someone only knows how to love in a certain way and all we can do is do our best to bridge the gap and show them how to love us in a way that suits us better. It is easier when you stop seeing everyone as the enemy and start understanding that we all have our own things that have shaped us to show love in a certain way. It doesn’t justify things, but it means you understand better and you try to love others better but also love yourself and know your boundaries, and be kinder to others.

I recommend it is a wonderful story with good depth and fascinating art.

Book Review

Moon Reads: A Treason of Thorns

A Treason of Thorns by Laura Weymouth

Rating: MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px MoonKestrel Logo2 20px Grey

Nothing is perfect, and as such, the reviews in this blog are chaotic. My main aim is to share my thoughts, joy and opinions on a book, not make a publication perfect review. This blog endorses authenticity, showing up and joy over perfection.

Disclaimer: Receiving a review copy from the publisher does not affect my opinion of the book. If you think I review it highly it is due to me knowing my taste well and therefore not requesting books I won’t enjoy. And I am not obligated to review the book if I do not like it, so you may not see bad reviews due to me preferring not to hype down a particular book. I only do reviews of books I disagreed with if I think it is worth bringing a topic or warning to light.


Between the fact that this was written by Laura Weymouth who has a way with nostalgic, emotion-heavy interesting books and the fact it was usually put in lists alongside Mexican Gothic due to the whole sentient houses vibe, I had to read this book.

The start sets us on the life events that will change Violet’s, also goes as Vi, life and take from the comfort of the life she thinks she will have to depending on the hopes that she can return to that life. And then we get to the return, why she is coming back and the conditions on which she is.

I will start by saying that I struggled a little with Vi through most of the book. She was a well-written character but she was also incredibly frustrating with her hyper-focus on the need to be a Caretaker, ignoring so many other things and at first not really providing good motives beyond “this is what I should be doing” and hanging on what ifs and hopes from the past, to slightly extreme points. This kept frustrating me because at times I just wanted her to sit down, realise how much she had achieved outside of Burleigh and just you know, do something with it.

However, as the story progresses, we do find out and understand her motives better, which meant that by the time we come close to the end I was not frustrated with her anymore. I still didn’t agree with some of her choices but I saw them in a better light. So, I do warn you that if you expect a perfectly polished character that will do what you want, this isn’t it.

However, this is definitely a dark and interesting book about grief, and about agency. It tackles in some ways the definition or idea of what one is destined to do and if our destiny really is what we think or not, and if we can reshape it or ignore it. But not only that, it works on trying to understand why we do things sometimes for that destiny or against it and what agency we have.

I liked the story, and think it could have had more lore, more of the story of Burleigh and the houses, of how Caretakers and magic worked a little more padded up because I wanted to know more about how this universe worked. And I did love the idea of how far Vi is willing to go and what that means for her.

Overall, I would say this is a gritty book, with a main character that has a lot of ideas of who she ought to be and what the perfect future is, and who then has to grapple with reality and challenges that she didn’t expect alongside a magical house and a minor cast of characters. I recommend it for the emotional background and interesting approach to grief and magic. Alongside some other items, I would rather not mention much because it would be spoilers but that became very interesting including the King and the bond on houses and that part of the lore.